Painting Plywood


Plywood surfaces are usually not very attractive on their own unless they have been veneered. Attaching veneer or buying pre-veneered plywood or board is often not appropriate for many projects, especially the more functional ones for the kitchen, bathroom or garage storage.

A straight paint job is often the only finish required. The results can be quite pleasing if some amount of care is taken.

I often get questions about painting plywood, which is understandable because painted plywood can look terrible if not done properly.

I prefer to use the non-glossy paints called "satin" paints. These paints do not shine or look like plastic emulsion. They give a smooth, silky look. Dulux and a number of other companies makes these paints and you can choose from many different shades.

The stages to a very decent if not excellent finish are as follows:

1. Light sanding. No abrading, just rubbing gently to remove burrs, loose bits and so on.

First Coat of Primer Applied

2. First coat of wood primer; slop it on any way you can. No need for any technique or finesse.
Water, chalk, paint and scraper

3. Chalk, water and paint mix coat. Chalk powder is readily available in all paint shops; mix this with a bit of water to get a thick cream-like consistency; to this add a bit of paint; mix well and apply.

The chalk coating dried and sanded. Looks a bit patchy but not to worry

If the chalk coating after sanding looks patchy not to worry, the next step will fix it

4. After this dries, sand it lightly with 220 grit paper. If the application is extremely patchy you might consider applying another light coat of the chalk mixture. But this is strictly not necessary provided the coverage has been consistent and complete.

Second coat of primer applied after sanding chalk coat. Slight patches visible.

After another coat of primer things begin to look up even though patches are still visible. Go for another coat of primer if you are a perfectionist give another coat or esle let it be. A coat of paint will even things and no patches will show.

5. Second coat of primer.

6. Sand after primer has dried and apply first coat of paint.

This photo was taken after second coat of paint has dried and sanded thoroughly. In places the primer base is exposed. This is fine because all the high spots have been sanded and the next few coats applied thinly will coat everything beautifully.

7. Let paint dry for at least 24 hours; in the monsoons 2/3 days is better. Then sand thoroughly with 320 grit paper. Do not fret if the sanding exposes parts of the primer coat. The important thing is to rub down the high spots and brush marks of the first paint coat. After sanding the surface should feel smooth to the touch.

8. Apply second coat of paint; let dry and sand again.

This is after the second coat of paint has dried. The surface is excellent already but another round of sanding and a thin third coat would do wonders.

9. Apply a thin third coat of paint diluted appropriately with turpentine. This should provide a good final finish.

Generally, there is no need to do anything further but at times for the extra smooth surface you might want to run down the last coat lightly with 600 grit sandpaper lurbicated with a little water. But be gentle this time and do not overdo things as the last coat is pretty thin.

If the surface will be subject to heavy usage consider placing a sheet of glass over it. A coat of water based Polyurethane could also be applied but that tends to spoil the satin look.

Indranil Banerjie
14 August 2014

Comments

  1. It is very nicely put Indranil.
    I think I would be correct in saying that the process you have mentioned will take about a week at least in good weather. Contributes to patience...
    I have also used ready made wood putty for small projects, which saves the problem of mixing chalk and paint.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Vinay, What should I ask for in the hardware store for wood putty? Do I have to mix it with anything before applying. Should the primer be applied first or after applying the wood putty? Sorry about the questions and Thanks.

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    2. Hi Prad.
      There are three types of ready made putty available. One is wall putty, one is metal putty and one is wood putty. Wood putty may not be always available in hardware stores, but it does exist. It is called just that: wood putty. They may try to sell you metal or wall putty instead, but unless the box says wood putty, do not buy it.
      An alternative to wood putty is a mixture of chalk (zinc oxide) and paint or varnish. Indranil has described using chalk and white paint.
      This has to be applied after the primer. Primer, (one or two coats), light sand, putty, sand, and then paint.
      Asian paints also recommends this
      https://www.asianpaints.com/bd/expert_help/pg_pp_wooden_surfaces.aspx
      Thinning of the putty depends on what the base is. Turpentine or NC thinner should work. Try it out on a small bit of putty first. I have found readymade putty is much easier to use than making putty every time with chalk. The putty I got was a brownish one.
      Metal putty can also be used on wood. However this does not sand so easily into a smooth finish once it dries.
      If you cannot get wood putty I recommend the chalk and paint way.

      Delete
    3. Vinay you make an amazing blog even better. Thank you so much for the detailed answer.Very helpful!

      Delete
  2. Vinay: Yes, patience is the key. It took me more than a week to complete the process as it has been extremely humid for the past few weeks. Ready made putty would be fine for small projects I suppose.

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  3. Indranil ...thanks for covering the topic in such a crisp manner for amateurs like me ....have some queries ..
    a) could you give brand names of primer .. is it liquid or solid and apply with a brush ?
    b) apply chalk with a brush ? size ?
    c) painters use another type of sand paper with water .. is that to be used ?
    appreciate if you could guide .. thanks , Matter


    ReplyDelete
  4. SKMatter:
    a) All paint manufacturers like Asian Paints, Dulux, Berger and so on make wood primer, which is a liquid much like paint and applied with a regular paint brush.
    b) Chalk should be applied with a scraper (like the one shown in the photo) or with an old credit card. The idea is to spread the chalk mixture evenly and smoothly across the surface.
    c) Wet & Dry Sandpaper can be used for wet sanding but that is appropriate only in the last stage if you wish to rub down the final paint coat.
    Best wishes

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. In my experience, painting with paint brush is cumbersome and error prone. Roller is very good for this kind of job. Try applying paint to roller with a brush and then roll the brush. It spreads paint very evenly.

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    2. Kannan Ram23 April, 2015

      Namaste,

      Thank you for this informative article. Just a query; what "paint" did you use in the chalk mixture? Is it the "satin" paint you were describing earlier or something else; another thing, by primer, I assume it is "wood" primer?

      Can one use paints intended for "walls" for plywood (just a question); or does one need to specifically use paints intended for wood surfaces (like tractor emulsion etc.) ?

      Thanks again!

      Delete
    3. Kannan: By primer I mean "Wood Primer". I used Dulux paints' Satin Finish oil paint, a bit of which I added to the water and chalk mixture for added hiolding power or else the chalk will come off after the water dies. One should always use paints specifically intended for wood. These are generally oil paints and are sometimes put on plaster walls in hospitals and other commercial institutions. Plastic paint on plaster/cement walls look awful in my opinion but are relatively easy to wash and keep clean. Nowadays the preferred paint for plaster/cement walls are acrylic emulsions of various kinds soluble in water. I am not sure how these would adhere to wood. Better to stick to "oil paints" for wood which are generally soluble in turpentine and not water. In the West, several varieties of water based paints are available for painting wood but I am not sure how they work and whether they are available in India.

      Delete
    4. Kannan Ram30 April, 2015

      Namaste,

      Thanks for the clarification. I just went through Sheenlac's catalogue and the very variety of their product range is simply mind blogging; plausibly because I am a newbie(?).

      Nevertheless, I found this article VERY useful. I am sure many newbies would appreciate if you could further elucidate (in a series of posts maybe) about the various options for staining / painting wood/plywood/mdf etc. and I am sure that such posts would save a lot of waste, not to mention the mess ...!

      Thanks again!

      Delete
    5. Kannan: Many thanks for your comments. I am glad you found the article useful. I will put up more posts on finishing which is a big and interesting subject (of which I have very limited knowledge).

      Delete
  5. Thank you for prompt reply ..makes it amply clear !!
    SK Matter ( Sudhir )

    ReplyDelete
  6. Sangeetha Sampath25 March, 2015

    Hi! I have a question. I have a couple of pieces of MDF furniture i want to paint. Would the same steps of sanding, priming and painting apply for MDF too? I did some research on the internet and it said no sanding required for MDF. Also what kind of paint should i use. Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
  7. Sangeetha: Yes, go through the same process except initial sanding should be light and with a single higher grade of paper (320 grit would be fine). You could dispense with the intial sanding if the MDF is of very good quality, esle it would be better to give it a light once over. Regarding paints, there are many types available these days; consult with your local paint shop for alternatives. I prefer the matt or satin varieties that do not have the tacky gloss associated with enamel paints.

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  8. Sangeetha Sampath26 March, 2015

    Thank you so much!

    ReplyDelete
  9. Hello, Srikanth here.
    This is a really useful read for any hobbyist.
    But ive questions.What is the ratio in which you mix water, chalk and paint?
    And is that the same paint that you use in the later coats?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Srikanth: Do not have specific ratio; the idea is to make a consistent creamy paste which would be easy to apply and yet not be too thin. Do not mix too much water or else the paint will not bind. Yes, it is the same paint I use later. best of luck.

      Delete
  10. hi.
    I had problems when I used acrylic paint on wood(actually polish guy just did it wo my knowledge).so wen I asked in shop he gave me something called essdee putty..cn anyone tell me if this is diff frm other putty..do v apply primer then putty n then sand it and paint??

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Vidya, I have no experience with acrylic paint on wood or essdee putty so cannot guide you. Generally there is no need to apply putty on wood unless it is plywood or the wood has holes and dents in it. Best method I know of painting is to first apply a coat or two of wood primer, then appkly a mix of chalk powder/plaster of paris, water and apint, then sand, apply another coat of primer if required and finaly paint two or three coats as desired.

      Delete
  11. HI I went to a hardware store locally and asked for wood putty, he gave a good thought and said, you mean M W White. I asked, is it Wood putty, he said yes. Also told me that I will have to mix this with Fevicol. Any idea what this MW white mean here?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sorry, Shabhaz; haven't heard of MW White.

      Delete
  12. I WENT TO BIG PAIN SHOP & ASK HIM TO GIVE ME WOOD PUTTY FOR PLYWOOD. HE GAVE ME asian paint acrylic wall putty. I SAID THAT MAN THAT IS THIS A WOOD PUTTY & HE SAID YES. I ASKED HIM THE WHY IT IS WRITTEN ACRYLIC WALL PUTTY? HE SAID: SIR, ALL THE CARPENTERS IN THE CITY BUY THIS asian paint acrylic wall putty FOR PLYWOOD.THEY USE THIS PUTTY FOR PLYWOOD., BELIEVE ME TAKE THIS PRODUCT & USE FIRST.
    SO CAN I USE THAT asian paint acrylic wall putty FOR PLYWOOD???
    DO CHALK POWER MENTION IN ABOVE ARTICLE IS A POWER OF SAME CHALK, WHICH WE USE FOR WRITING ON BLACKBOARD.
    I GUESS I CAN USE THAT asian paint acrylic wall putty MIXED WITH PAINT. THIS asian paint acrylic wall putty DO NOT NEED WATER TO BE ADDED AS IT IS IN ALREADY SEMISOLID PAST IN SEALED PLASTIC BOX.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Jameel, from my experience wall putty is not a good idea for coating plywood. Chalk or "Chalk Mitti" as it is known locally mixed with paint and a little water works for me. If acrylic wall putty works for you, then good for you.

      Delete
    2. Can we use plaster of paris as you have mention in your reply to vidya sundaresan. If yes, Birla white cement can as work then, mixed with water & paint.
      Do Chalk Mitti is a kind of fine soft soil?
      I will return that acrylic putty & ask for chalk mitti to that shopkeeper as i had not opened the seal of that box.

      Delete
    3. Plaster of Paris will work but I don't know about white cement. PoP and cement are very different materials. Do not substitute one for the other.

      Delete
  13. Hi, Interesting going through this site though my requirement is only for a hobby. I was wondering if any of you could let me know where i can purchase a small quantity of Calcium Carbonate in pure form with texture preferably like talc powder. I am trying to make my own chalk paint for distress work.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Lyn, you will have to share your location for people to help you.

      Delete
  14. Replies
    1. Lyn, I don't know about Mumbai but try your local paint shop and ask for "Chalk Powder" or "Chalk Mitti" for mixing with paint. Check it out to see if it meets your requirements.

      Delete
    2. Thanks for your response.. will go hunting for it at the local hardware store. Today I tried making chalk paint with POP.. it has dried well on glass but I think I will get a better finish with chalk.

      Delete
  15. Great Blog Indranil

    Going through your blog. great information for beginners like me
    i have a doubt do you dilute your paint with turpentine for every coat or just the last coat?

    ReplyDelete
  16. Thanks! I normally dilute paint before use as I find the consistency of paint in the can to be too thick. I pour off an amount of paint then thin it slightly to a consistency which would make it easy to apply and allow the paint to self level. Too much dilution however would cause the paint to float around, form bubbles, drip and so on. You have to experiment with the amount you wish to dilute - whatever you are comfortable with is the right amount.

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  17. Anonymous25 June, 2016

    Indranil and Vinay- Many thanks for this post. Very helpful for people like me who are looking for a DIY paintjob!

    ReplyDelete
  18. Hai Indraneel sir, i found what i was looking for. Awesome. So informative. I am gonna start right away. There were wastage leftover plywood pieces from wood work done few years ago which I decided to reuse and make it into a small shelf for my work area. A 50*40 open shelf. I wanted to do that also on my own but it wont look neat as i have no experience making shelves :) I got it done from a local carpenter's shop and now am sitting with the same to get the painting/polishing work done. I ahve some left over bits of Wood Primer Sand Sealer and Polyurethane solution (I dont know what ia it used for). Let me start with sanding. By the time i am done with Primer I hope i will get a reply from u. What are Sand sealer solution and Polyurethane solution used for in wood finish? I am planning to give my shelf a Rosewood stained finish rather than paint. Please help me understand with the processes and the two different solutions. Thanking u in advancem Pramod

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  19. I have applied the first coat of primer. After drying i must sand it right? With what grit??? Same 320???

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  20. Pramod, primer is used for painting not staining/polishing. Polyurethane sanding sealer and topcoat are used as a finish over stain. I sduggest you read some article on the net ansd watch youtube videos on the same before proceeding.

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  21. Ho many layers of putty shud be applied before coloring the surface???

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. If by colouring you mean painting, one good layer of putty well applied should be enough.

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  22. No i am going for stain. Now first coat of primer sanding is over. Tomorrow i will apply putty. So after putty sanding if surface looks good to go then i can start coloring it right? What are the steps for coloring? What is the first thing to be applied after sanding the putty coat? How to mix color etc pls advise.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This is not the way to stain wood. It is better you paint the surface - staining it would be a disaster. Also, stain will not normally adhere to putty. I suggest you do some serious research on staining before proceeding. Best of luck.

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  23. Oh ok. Then i will do painting. What paint i sgud use and in what consistency? Also pls tell me how much paint to add for making putty paste. Say if i am using 250 gms of powder how much paint to be added. I underatamd paint to be added after adding water, right sir? I bought a small.bottle of white paint.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. `Pramod, there are certain things you can learn only through trial and error; there are no formulas for many things. So please experiment with putty paste and so on. 250 gms of powder is a lot - start with 100g, mix a little water to make it a thick cream like paste then add a bit of paint. You can use paints from any company - Dulux, Asian Paints, Nerolac and so on.

      Delete
  24. No i asked about the finiahing paint.

    1. Is there any particular type...like oil based. ..normal paont we use on metals like grill, gate etc will donor there are paints for wood in particular.

    2. Shud i dilute the paint before applying with terpantine?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. 1. Normal paint is fine
      2. Dilute it a wee bit
      3. Improve your spelling

      Delete
  25. Am using my mobile...hence the typos. I typed fast and didn't really do a proof reading 😆. Typing on mobile device and getting all the words correct is real tough task. This time am checking every word ☺. Ok so what do i do to get glossy finish without any paint brush marks??? Is there any product that can be applied as a last coat to get this? Done with white waste or so??? Thank u

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. 1. For a glossy finish completely free of brush mark you will have to go for spray painting.
      2. Else, practice painting with slightly diluted paint (experiment to get the right result). May not get an entirely brush mark free surface but it would be good enough.

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  26. I have started sanding the first putty coat with 320 paper. It is exposing small dents n grooves. Am i doing it too much? I shud do only do light sanding or i shud do thorough sanding??? If there r small dents grooves lines etc, shud i got for 2nd coat of putty?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Impossible to make out what you are doing; suggest you consult a professional painter and purchase a good book on painting. Best of luck.

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  27. Hi. I want to put primer on top of Veneered MDF (dining table top) Please suggest as to which brand to buy. (based out of Chennai).

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  28. Painting a veneered MDF doesnt make sense .. it is like painting over Laminate...

    ReplyDelete
  29. Indranil
    I am having some partitions put up with plywood, which were then to be painted. However the wood on one side is so good, that I would like to have it waxed or varnished, to show the natural grain. Could you suggest what we could do? I would like a satin finish.

    P.S. the plywood is by Citizen in Hyderabad.

    BharathN

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Varnish would work well - use a sanding sealer to close the pores; I would go for a satin polyurethane finish with a pu sanding sealer applied first.

      Delete
  30. Hello indranil sir , very good info which I got through conversation, one small question which ply is good to use for residences wood work

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  31. Any commercially available plywood will work. The two better brands I use are Century and Greenply. They tend to be more dense. Avoid local brands whose quality may be iffy. However, at times local brands can come up with excellent plywood. Use 18 or 19mm plywood for most of your interior work.

    ReplyDelete
  32. My old wooden stool has small dents and cracks on it.
    Can I use Birla White Cement on it.
    And how should I use it ?
    Or should I directly use Paint on it..

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Don't use cement, it will fall out eventually. Use wood putty; apply primer and then paint.

      Delete
  33. Hi Indranil,

    You got an amazing blog with lot of information. Thank you for doing this.
    I have few questions,
    What did you do to the edges of the plywood? same procedure as others areas?

    Is it possible to round the edges with a round over bit and then paint it in the above method?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Normally the plywood edges being porous and often with gaps is covered by strips of wood or edge banding.
      You could round the edges with a router but the finish might not be very good.
      If you do decide to paint the untreated adge you should prepare it well with a lot of sanding and priming.
      Though over time, I have seen well finished raw plywood edges again showing the internal strips. Perhaps this is because the paint erodes or collapses into the minute crevices of plywood edges over time once again exposing its internal nature.
      If you plan do something for your home, I would still recommend gluing wood strips over the edges before finishing. Any way, that's what I do, always.

      Delete
    2. Thanks for the reply.

      I will try the wood strips. I already cut down the pieces to size for a kitchen cabinet. I'll try to find the thinnest wood strip for this.

      Delete
  34. Dear Indranil...I would like to put some task for you...can you suggest the whole 3 bhk apartment's wood work (ply wood) without pasting the veneers or laminates, can be painted aesthetically...after going through your article I hope it is possible...in such a case, can you help me in Hyderabad.,,?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, plywood can be painted beautifully with a little care and the right technique. Please feel free to ask me for any clarification. best of luck.

      Delete
  35. Hi ! I am deviating a bit from the topic but i just had pop done on my interior walls n my painter is using a layer of primer n on top a mix of chalk mitti n white enamel paint before applying required color paint coats. Is the process ok?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Not very clued up on painting walls but that does seem very odd indeed. Why put a mixture of chalk mitti and enamel paint over primer? Shouldn't he apply the paint directly over primer?

      Delete
  36. Hello Indranil Da,

    Excellent article and very informative.
    I am planning to do a DIY project having white painted cabinets made of plywood for my kitchen. It will great if you could provide some suggestions.

    - Suggestion on paint brand which can be scratch resistant and quite durable for Indian kitchen.
    - Suggestion on brand ready-made primer.
    - Do you recommend hi-gloss look or Matt look.
    - Read about PU & NC paint for wood, what is the difference? Which one is recommenced.

    Thank you!
    Smita

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Try PU paints; they are pretty rugged. Primer would depend on the brand you are chosing. Sirca would be a good choice. Get a matching primer and paint. Gloss or matt depends entirely on your taste. Haven't heard of NC paint (Nitro Cellulose is normally a finish). PU should be good enough.

      Delete
  37. Hi Indranil

    Looking to get a rough look which accentuates the wood grain, where the dips get filled by chalks and raised parts are wood. Think of raw brick walls as well alongside.

    Thinking of doing a chalk rubover on plywood, followed by primer or just varnish. The final finish should be matt or a matt sheen, not shiny like a normal varnish. Would a wax coating work? Its for a home office, where we are putting in some partitions.

    What materials and process should one use?

    Thanks

    Bharath

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. 1. Cannot predict how your idea will work out; best to experiment first.
      2. Chalk by itself is not stable and will need some binder; best shellac with a natural wood tint or dark tint if you want contrast.
      3. Good coating for such an application would be satin pu (oil based) rubbed down after 5 coats or so with 400, 600 and 100 grit wet/dry sandpaper.

      Delete
  38. Nisha iyer29 March, 2017

    Hi Indranil Sir,
    Hope you're doing well.i just happened to Google as how to paint on wood.I just have a couple of doubts.Would really appreciate if you can help me with it. I recently removed all the laminates IE Sunmica from my old TV cabinet.. However,now it's all wood now with some burrs.I want to paint it now .. i know the process,thanks to you :) like sand paper to smoothen it,then the wood primer all etc ..All i want to ask you is sir,i have ASIAN PAINTS LUSTRE WALL paints with me which is left after painting the walls .. can i use the same for this .. thank you in advance ..
    Would highly appreciate if you can help me with this

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Nisha. Sometimes wall paints work on wood but often they don't do well in the long run. While I have no specific knowledge about ASIAN PAINTS LUSTRE WALL paints, my advice would be to stick to a wood primer and wood paint combination.

      Delete
  39. Anonymous27 June, 2017

    hello sir. we are to paint our marine ply wooden temple and a box --for the first time. we wish to use only oil based primer and fevicryl acryllic/metallic finish oil paint. no water based colour or procedure (except for initial wiping off the piece after sand paper used by carpenter). the carpenter has already rubbed it with a sand paper. i am enlisting what i have thought to do--please add whatever else is to be done between/b4/after the steps enlisted:
    1 clean the rubbed surface with a wet cloth
    2 use an oil based primer-dilute it with turpentine also oil based--turpentine 1/10th of the primer (proportion) and apply it with a brush
    3 let it dry for 8 hrs
    4 apply 2nd coat of primer with a roller
    5 let it dry for 8 hrs
    6 for painting it-apply with a brush first coat of fevicryl acryllic colour for wood surface/oil paint with metallic finish variety-we need metallic finish
    7 let it dry for 8hrs
    8 apply 2nd coat with a roller
    9 let it dry for 8 hrs
    do we also have to rub the surface with some sand paper after 1st coat of primer and also first coat of paint ?
    is there some process of mixing primer and colour with something only oil based substance to get a smooth finish and look
    what is missing in our procedure?

    ReplyDelete
  40. Hi Indranil,

    Thanks so much for this write-up. I cane across it as Was searching for advice on a problem I have. I'm starting a new DIY project - painting a small plywood cupboard. I'm planning to do a scumbled, layered acrylic (Fevicryl) base in olive/green shades and then paint a design over that.

    I got the cupboard primed by the carpenter/painter, but unfortunately he used his own brains and applied white laminate to the edges before priming the rest of the surfaces.

    I made him remove the laminate, but my problem now is that the edges of the plywood, which show the layers of ridges, are exposed, and the carpenter has left for his village. I'm assuming I'd have to apply primer, then sand it, then apply wood putty if I want to paint with acrylic paint over the edges? As I said, the flat surfaces of the cupboard have all been primed.

    I'd appreciate any suggestions from you. I usually paint on canvas and this is my first paint-on-wood/plywood project.

    Warm regards,
    Anita

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The plywood edges will look ugly unless you do a superb putty job. Normally, plywood edges are covered with edge banding (commercially available) or with real wood strips. I would recommend you get thin strips of wood (available at nay timber retailer) and glue them on before proceeding.

      Delete

  41. Sir,
    Have u come across polyester putty?


    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Can't say I have come across it. In fact I have no idea what regular putty or the newer wall putties are made of. Maybe some are polyester based. Let us know if you have more information on this. Thanks

      Delete
  42. Thanks to your helpful post..but i have a query that.
    Chalk powder to be mixed with wood primer or the main color

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I suppose you can but have never tried it and don't know what effect it will have.

      Delete
  43. Thanks for the useful article. Here is the summary of steps in Plywood Painting

    * Light sanding. 120 sanding paper.
    * First coat of wood primer.
    * Chalk, water, paint mix. 1 Coat.
    * Sanding with 220 grit paper.
    * Chalk, water, paint mix. 2nd Coat (Optional)
    * Second coat of wood primer.
    * Sanding with 220 grit paper.
    * First coat of paint.
    * Sand with 320 grit paper.
    * Second coat of paint.
    * Dry for 1/2/3 days.
    * Sand with 600 grit paper.
    * Third coat of paint.
    * A coat of water based polyurethane (optional).

    I am currently using these steps to paint a small plywood furniture! Hopefully it will come good (at least let the beginners luck happen)!!

    Happy DIY!!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Well summarised. Let me know how it turns out. Best of luck.

      Delete
  44. Dear Indranil Sir,
    Your article is very helpful. though I have one doubt. I want to paint outer surfaces of my shoerack but have laminate/veneer on inner surfaces for convinience. Can you tell me if painting on the outer surfaces as per the steps described by you above will have any kind of effect )good/bad/no effect) on the laminate/veneer applied to the inner surface of the rack? Rack is made of plywood.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks for the prompt reply. Though I have one more query. Can I paint over old veneered surfaces as per above steps? I have an old wardrobe and the veneer finish is withering off at places..I want to paint it..Can I do it similar way?

      Delete
    2. Not if it is over plastic veneers/laminates but will work over natural wood veneers.

      Delete

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